Waterdown farming family continues Royal tradition

WhatsOn Nov 14, 2017 Flamborough Review

Tradition runs deep at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair and Flamborough's Creighton family is part of its past, present and, hopefully, future.

Marvin Creighton Jr. is the third generation to be involved with the Royal's horticulture section. In 1972, his grandfather Earl received a medal on the fair's 50th anniversary as one of the eight people participating in the annual agricultural expo since its inception. Marvin Sr. was on the horticulture committee for many years and now his son is a member.

Marvin Jr. says he is going to try to be at the fair for the 100th anniversary of the Royal because that will mean his family will have been part of the show for a century. "That's only five years," he pointed out.

Marvin Jr., a market gardener in Waterdown, won the Woodville Farms Award for the heaviest cabbage. "I just went out into the field and pulled the largest cabbage," he says about the vegetable that weighed in at 18 lbs 2 oz.

"Mentioning the Royal brings tears to my eyes," Creighton said. "It's important to be part of the Royal. It's good to be recognized in the world of farming."

Marvin Jr. remembers his grandfather's entries to the fair — large displays of a variety of vegetables that would later be purchased by grocery stores.

"There was a time when I was exhibiting and my grandfather was the judge!" he recalled.

As a member of the horticulture committee, Marvin Jr. is trying to come up with ways to encourage more young people or city gardeners to enter the horticulture classes at the Royal. He believes it is important to remind people that vegetables are an agricultural commodity along with the cattle, sheep and pigs.

He doesn't know whether any of his three children will continue the family tradition of involvement with the Royal but, since he's not ready to retire for a few years, there's still time.


Waterdown farming family continues Royal tradition

WhatsOn Nov 14, 2017 Flamborough Review

Tradition runs deep at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair and Flamborough's Creighton family is part of its past, present and, hopefully, future.

Marvin Creighton Jr. is the third generation to be involved with the Royal's horticulture section. In 1972, his grandfather Earl received a medal on the fair's 50th anniversary as one of the eight people participating in the annual agricultural expo since its inception. Marvin Sr. was on the horticulture committee for many years and now his son is a member.

Marvin Jr. says he is going to try to be at the fair for the 100th anniversary of the Royal because that will mean his family will have been part of the show for a century. "That's only five years," he pointed out.

Marvin Jr., a market gardener in Waterdown, won the Woodville Farms Award for the heaviest cabbage. "I just went out into the field and pulled the largest cabbage," he says about the vegetable that weighed in at 18 lbs 2 oz.

"Mentioning the Royal brings tears to my eyes," Creighton said. "It's important to be part of the Royal. It's good to be recognized in the world of farming."

Marvin Jr. remembers his grandfather's entries to the fair — large displays of a variety of vegetables that would later be purchased by grocery stores.

"There was a time when I was exhibiting and my grandfather was the judge!" he recalled.

As a member of the horticulture committee, Marvin Jr. is trying to come up with ways to encourage more young people or city gardeners to enter the horticulture classes at the Royal. He believes it is important to remind people that vegetables are an agricultural commodity along with the cattle, sheep and pigs.

He doesn't know whether any of his three children will continue the family tradition of involvement with the Royal but, since he's not ready to retire for a few years, there's still time.


Waterdown farming family continues Royal tradition

WhatsOn Nov 14, 2017 Flamborough Review

Tradition runs deep at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair and Flamborough's Creighton family is part of its past, present and, hopefully, future.

Marvin Creighton Jr. is the third generation to be involved with the Royal's horticulture section. In 1972, his grandfather Earl received a medal on the fair's 50th anniversary as one of the eight people participating in the annual agricultural expo since its inception. Marvin Sr. was on the horticulture committee for many years and now his son is a member.

Marvin Jr. says he is going to try to be at the fair for the 100th anniversary of the Royal because that will mean his family will have been part of the show for a century. "That's only five years," he pointed out.

Marvin Jr., a market gardener in Waterdown, won the Woodville Farms Award for the heaviest cabbage. "I just went out into the field and pulled the largest cabbage," he says about the vegetable that weighed in at 18 lbs 2 oz.

"Mentioning the Royal brings tears to my eyes," Creighton said. "It's important to be part of the Royal. It's good to be recognized in the world of farming."

Marvin Jr. remembers his grandfather's entries to the fair — large displays of a variety of vegetables that would later be purchased by grocery stores.

"There was a time when I was exhibiting and my grandfather was the judge!" he recalled.

As a member of the horticulture committee, Marvin Jr. is trying to come up with ways to encourage more young people or city gardeners to enter the horticulture classes at the Royal. He believes it is important to remind people that vegetables are an agricultural commodity along with the cattle, sheep and pigs.

He doesn't know whether any of his three children will continue the family tradition of involvement with the Royal but, since he's not ready to retire for a few years, there's still time.