A feast for the senses at Waterdown's Indian Hut

WhatsOn Nov 28, 2019 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Stepping across the threshold of the Indian Hut, aromas fill the senses.

A mixture of curry, cardamom and cumin hang in the air and welcome the customer to breathe in the flavours.

What was once home to Village Fish and Chips, the Main Street North eatery is brightly lit with walls the colour of butternut squash.

“We are really glad that people are liking our food,” said chef Lovepreet Arneja.

The restaurant has been open for about four months and is the second Indian Hut location in the Golden Horseshoe with plans for a possible third in London, said Arneja, who settled on Waterdown for his restaurant's second location.

“There was no other option for the people," he said. "There was only fish and chips, burgers, pizzas."

Arneja explained that he was inspired to become a chef after growing up with his mother’s cooking and also watching his uncle find success as a head chef in the United Kingdom.

“He inspired me to cook like him,” he said, adding he began his studies in India before moving to the UK to complete his schooling.

His mother also introduced him to various flavours and the proper way to cook meals.

“It’s basically a tradition," said Arneja, and soon thereafter, "my passion," he added.

Looking over the menu, there are plenty of options to choose from, including onion bhaji — little fried fritters made with chickpea batter, butter chicken poutine, samosas, chicken, beef or lamb korma, paneer tikka masala and tandoori chicken or mixed vegetable korma.

Arneja said one of the most important lessons he learned from his mother was that it was all about temperature.

“When you cook something always smell first, taste it, if it’s good for you then the people (are) going to love it,” he said.

“You have to give 100 per cent to that dish.”

Indian Hut has enjoyed a steady clientele and new visitors are coming in all the time. The ingredients are fresh and each recipe has been handed down through the generations. Many of the dishes are gluten free. Indian Hut also serves vegetarian options.

Overall, the community's support of the new restaurant and its flavourful dishes has been strong.

“They’re loving it.”

A feast for the senses at Waterdown's Indian Hut

WhatsOn Nov 28, 2019 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Stepping across the threshold of the Indian Hut, aromas fill the senses.

A mixture of curry, cardamom and cumin hang in the air and welcome the customer to breathe in the flavours.

What was once home to Village Fish and Chips, the Main Street North eatery is brightly lit with walls the colour of butternut squash.

“We are really glad that people are liking our food,” said chef Lovepreet Arneja.

Related Content

The restaurant has been open for about four months and is the second Indian Hut location in the Golden Horseshoe with plans for a possible third in London, said Arneja, who settled on Waterdown for his restaurant's second location.

“There was no other option for the people," he said. "There was only fish and chips, burgers, pizzas."

Arneja explained that he was inspired to become a chef after growing up with his mother’s cooking and also watching his uncle find success as a head chef in the United Kingdom.

“He inspired me to cook like him,” he said, adding he began his studies in India before moving to the UK to complete his schooling.

His mother also introduced him to various flavours and the proper way to cook meals.

“It’s basically a tradition," said Arneja, and soon thereafter, "my passion," he added.

Looking over the menu, there are plenty of options to choose from, including onion bhaji — little fried fritters made with chickpea batter, butter chicken poutine, samosas, chicken, beef or lamb korma, paneer tikka masala and tandoori chicken or mixed vegetable korma.

Arneja said one of the most important lessons he learned from his mother was that it was all about temperature.

“When you cook something always smell first, taste it, if it’s good for you then the people (are) going to love it,” he said.

“You have to give 100 per cent to that dish.”

Indian Hut has enjoyed a steady clientele and new visitors are coming in all the time. The ingredients are fresh and each recipe has been handed down through the generations. Many of the dishes are gluten free. Indian Hut also serves vegetarian options.

Overall, the community's support of the new restaurant and its flavourful dishes has been strong.

“They’re loving it.”

A feast for the senses at Waterdown's Indian Hut

WhatsOn Nov 28, 2019 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Stepping across the threshold of the Indian Hut, aromas fill the senses.

A mixture of curry, cardamom and cumin hang in the air and welcome the customer to breathe in the flavours.

What was once home to Village Fish and Chips, the Main Street North eatery is brightly lit with walls the colour of butternut squash.

“We are really glad that people are liking our food,” said chef Lovepreet Arneja.

Related Content

The restaurant has been open for about four months and is the second Indian Hut location in the Golden Horseshoe with plans for a possible third in London, said Arneja, who settled on Waterdown for his restaurant's second location.

“There was no other option for the people," he said. "There was only fish and chips, burgers, pizzas."

Arneja explained that he was inspired to become a chef after growing up with his mother’s cooking and also watching his uncle find success as a head chef in the United Kingdom.

“He inspired me to cook like him,” he said, adding he began his studies in India before moving to the UK to complete his schooling.

His mother also introduced him to various flavours and the proper way to cook meals.

“It’s basically a tradition," said Arneja, and soon thereafter, "my passion," he added.

Looking over the menu, there are plenty of options to choose from, including onion bhaji — little fried fritters made with chickpea batter, butter chicken poutine, samosas, chicken, beef or lamb korma, paneer tikka masala and tandoori chicken or mixed vegetable korma.

Arneja said one of the most important lessons he learned from his mother was that it was all about temperature.

“When you cook something always smell first, taste it, if it’s good for you then the people (are) going to love it,” he said.

“You have to give 100 per cent to that dish.”

Indian Hut has enjoyed a steady clientele and new visitors are coming in all the time. The ingredients are fresh and each recipe has been handed down through the generations. Many of the dishes are gluten free. Indian Hut also serves vegetarian options.

Overall, the community's support of the new restaurant and its flavourful dishes has been strong.

“They’re loving it.”